SOMERSWORTH FARMERS MARKET OPENS

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Jordan Pike from Two Toad Farm in Lebanon, Maine, sprays water on freshly harvested kale during the opening of the Somersworth Farmers Market held at Goodwin Comminity Health on Route 108.

Jordan Pike from Two Toad Farm in Lebanon, Maine, sprays water on freshly harvested kale during the opening of the Somersworth Farmers Market held at Goodwin Comminity Health on Route 108. Photo by John Huff/Fosters.com

By Judi Currie
jcurrie@seacoastonline.com

Posted Jun. 2, 2016 at 6:03 PM
Updated Jun 2, 2016 at 6:04 PM

SOMERSWORTH — Fresh local produce, meat and poultry are among the selections at the Somersworth Farmers Market.

The market will run every Thursday from 3-6 p.m. in the parking lot at Goodwin Community Health, 311 Route 108, Somersworth.

On opening day, Somersworth Mayor Dana Hilliard rang a bell to officially open the market for the season. He was joined by Superintendent of Schools Jeni Mosca.

The Spiritwind Farm in Lebanon, Maine, offered a variety of soaps and lotions. Kathy Ossinger said the goat milk moisturizer is the most popular. Some of the soaps were molded in the shape of Nubian goats.

The Root Seller/Comte Family Farms in Nottingham had about a dozen varieties of dried beans and maple syrup.

Jordan Pike and Marybeth Stocking of Two Toad Farm, also of Lebanon, Maine, had a variety of greens including a garlic plant that had a bulb and long leaves, “It is edible all the way up,” Pike said.

Linda Grecco and Gavin Maloney of Late Light Farm in Acton, Maine, had chocolate mint and catnip among their greens. Maloney said they will have more root vegetables as the season goes on but will also always offer the herbs. Grecco said the herbs are great as tea infusions.

They also displayed Grecco’s handmade macramé jewelry and some handmade wooden toys crafted by a neighbor.

Sanborn Hope Farm offered maple syrup and grass-fed beef, pork and free-range chicken. They plan to bring produce as things come into season.

Naoko Sears brought a selection of small plants and some of her eggshell mosaic arts. The paintings are made of tiny painted eggshell chips. She said the Nubble is one of her most popular.

Also returning this year is the matching program, which is available to all SNAP recipients through Granite State Market Match.

Jillian Hall, director of programs for Seacoast Eat Local, a member of the National Nutrition Incentive Network, said the market will be able to accept SNAP/EBT (food stamp) cards for a second season.

The matching program doubles SNAP purchases dollar for dollar, for up to $10, allowing SNAP customers to double their spending power.

Additionally, SNAP customers are able to access $20 worth of SNAP tokens at the last market of each month to spend on food at the farmers market.

The Somersworth Farmers Market is an initiative of the Strafford County Public Health Network and part of the Strafford County’s Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) to improve access to healthy foods to county residents.

Goodwin had a table where Mary Moynihan and Riona Corr were available to help people sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Healthcare Act, and provide information about other programs, such as dental care.

The Somersworth Farmers Market is accessible via the COAST bus and offers plenty of free parking.

According to Liz Clark, of GCH, they have nine vendors currently and more may be joining as seasonal items come in.

For more information or to get involved, people can contact Mollie Behan 603-516-2579 or farmersmarket@GoodwinCH.org.

The Somersworth Farmers Market also has a Facebook page atFacebook.com/SomersworthFarmersMarket.

To view this article please visit fosters at: http://www.fosters.com/article/20160602/NEWS/160609824

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